Author Topic: Seeker, a Bayfield 29  (Read 17826 times)

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Offline Godot

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #60 on: June 27, 2014, 04:23:38 PM »

I'm leaving on a month long sailing adventure four weeks from today


Very cool.



What's cooler is I just looked at the calendar and realized it is THREE weeks not four. Does put some pressure on getting things done, though.
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

Offline Godot

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #61 on: July 13, 2014, 10:05:48 PM »
Countdown to departure...Four days.

Four. Days.

Happily most of the work is done. I just need to seriously clean the boat and load provisions.

Gettin' exited!
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

Online Frank

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #62 on: July 14, 2014, 07:40:23 AM »
Have fun....don't be shy with the camera!
God made small boats for younger boys and older men

Offline jotruk

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #63 on: July 14, 2014, 08:25:56 AM »
looking farward to seeing pictures and reading about your adventure
s/v Wave Dancer
a 1979 27' Cherubini Hunter
Any sail boat regardless of size is a potential world cruiser, but a power boat is nothing more than a big expense at the next fuel dock

Offline Crazer

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #64 on: July 15, 2014, 07:51:09 PM »
What's the good of hanging out here if I can't live vicariously through others?  8) Take loads of pictures and keep us updated on your progress!
-Avery

SV Loon, Cayuga Lake

Offline Cyric30

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #65 on: July 16, 2014, 01:46:37 PM »
Fair Winds....and pictures...

Offline Godot

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #66 on: July 16, 2014, 06:16:04 PM »
I'll open a new thread once we depart (well, when we're safely in harbor with internet access). I'll save this thread to mostly talk about the boat itself and upgrades and changes I'm making.

Planned departure is Noon tomorrow. Realistic departure is a couple hours later. A six hour sail (or more likely motor...not much wind forecast) will get us situated for the C&D canal on Friday.

Yahoo!
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #67 on: July 16, 2014, 08:39:31 PM »
SUPER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   Have fun. Updates AND pictures!!!!
God made small boats for younger boys and older men

Offline Jim_ME

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #68 on: July 16, 2014, 09:09:12 PM »
Also wishing you fair winds, Adam.  :)

Offline Godot

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #69 on: August 31, 2015, 04:46:23 PM »
It's been a long time since I've given an update.

Boat work slowly continues. But I sail very frequently. No dock queen is Seeker!

A recap (so there is no need to read back to the beginning, especially since not everything is documented there).:

    What's been done:

    • Seeker has been rewired. Most of the lights are now LED.
    • The propane hot water heater has been removed. The discussion regards this was early in this thread; but the decision has not been regretted. The shower fixture has been removed from the head as well.
    • The holding tank and wet toilet were removed replaced with a Nature's Head composting toilet. This is a great, great upgrade! If a composter will fit on your boat (it's much larger than a typical marine toilet), I'd recommend it when the time comes to replace your existing toilet.
    • The Air Conditioning is long gone, and since I'm effectively not living aboard at the moment (ah, love), I'm rarely missing it. If I ever end up as a full time, at the dock, working live aboard this may be replaced. Or not. The wiring is in place should I go for it. Doesn't seem likely at the moment, though.
    • The cabin table looked nice; but it frequently got in the way and was more annoyance than anything, so it is now gone (95% percent of the time this is a great improvement, though I miss the table on occasion).
    • I've switched from my little homemade plywood dinghy (it went with my Seafarer several years ago) to a 10' Porta-Bote that fits on deck OK (I'm still figuring the best way to assemble and disassemble it on the small deck...I can do it; but there has got to be a better way).
    • I've installed three 20 watt solar panels on the starboard life lines, that work so well I'm planning on installing another three on the port rails (this supplements the one 20 watter that lives on the pushpit).
    • All the running rigging has now been replaced.
    • I pulled the aluminum diesel tank and had the lower three inches removed, which sealed up the pinhole leaks I had while getting the tank out of the bilge water (which likely caused the pinhole leaks).
    • I replaced all the fuel and water lines on the motor, as well as the alternator. Currently, outside of a little occasional smoke, the motor seems to be running rather strong.
    • The seat backs in the main cabin have been removed. I will likely get something setup on the port bunk eventually; but the original flip up backs were too much of a pain that allowed too little seat to sit on. The starboard bunk is set up as a permanent double.
    • Lots and lots of little repairs that I can't even think of right now


    What needs to be done:

    • I hauled her out last week for a quick seven days to get the bottom painted. Looks pretty good; but there are a couple dozen blisters in the keel. I don't think it is a big deal; but the next time I haul the boat will be for a winter (not this winter, maybe next), and I'll get those blisters opened up and drained for eventual repair. I really don't think they are a major concern; but I'll take care of them when I can.
    • The next long haul will also see me permanently sealing the now unused head intake/dump holes, and very likely the knot sensor hole. It's a nice instrument; but it is inconsistent, and now the very old display is going wonky.
    • The old Datamarine wind speed indicator is also not working. When I next pull the mast I'll see if it can be repaired affordably. If not it can't be replaced affordably, so I'll probably dump it. It's nice to know how strong the wind is for bragging rights; but honestly it isn't that big a deal. If yous outs in it, yous gots ta deal wit' it!
    • The standing rigging is due for replacement. I figure, not counting pulling and stepping the mast, I can get that all done for less than a grand. When the mast gets pulled, I'll replace the mast head light with a tri-color/anchor LED light, and the steaming light with an LED as well. I'll add an additional flag halyard (or at least the pulley, so I have the option). And maybe mast stairs.
    • Before heading over the horizon, the sails should probably be replaced. At least the mainsail should be. A quick quote on that shows I can do a mainsail for probably $1500, plus or minus a couple hundred based on features and sail loft. I am still trying to decide whether to go with full battens, no battens, or half full/half partial. I was leaning towards no battens; but the sail makers I've talked to seem appalled at the idea. Full battens might be the way to go. I understand sails last longer that way. I've currently got half full/half partial. I don't see anything to really recommend that standard setup. A third reef is definitely going to be part of any new sail. I'm planning on some kind of stack pack system, as well (a permanently mounted sail cover that integrates with the lazy jacks and closes from the top).
    • I really think I need a boom vang.
    • I really, really want to mount a winch on the mast. I'm bothered by having the main halyard led aft. I simply don't understand how people think it is better or safer, as trips to the mast seem to be necessary every time I raise, lower, or reef the main. Heck, at the very least the sail ties have to be put on and off, not to mention the cover. The luff reefing cringle still needs to be tied down (or released) when the wind increases/decreases (unless a rats nest reefing lines to the cockpit mishmash is installed). Besides, I'd really like to be able to use the spinnaker halyard that's at the mast to haul up the porta-bote, and that requires a winch. Interestingly, the topping lift is currently controlled at the mast, and I think I'd like to lead that line aft. Go figure.
    • The stitching in the dodger is rather rotted. It needs to be restitched. I'm hoping the inexpensive "Heavy Duty" Singer machine I have at home will handle the job.
    • I'm leaning towards installing refrigeration. The ice box has pitiful insulation and ice is a pain to deal with, so I'm thinking of installing at least two inches of additional insulation around the interior of the box (maybe three, although that will really decrease the size...perhaps not a bad thing), and adding one of the conversion kits. The box will be much smaller; but without the need for ice I figure the usable space will be fine. I've tried to be happy without a cold box; but I still keep buying ice so obviously this is something I want.
    • The cabin cushions need to be recovered.

So... I'm well into getting the boat the way I want it; but there is a long way left to go.


Oh, yea, about the "couple years"...it's been a "couple years" for several years now. I think I need to lock down a date, and soon. I'm thinking November 1st, 2015 as my get out of dodge deadline. Earlier is better.


Apparently I'm fatally optimistic. November 1st? This year? Dreaming! How's about April 2018?
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

Offline CharlieJ

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #70 on: August 31, 2015, 06:36:47 PM »
Sounds like you've been busy

Just a point- I've been quite happy with a battenless main sail. ,But the third reef is a very good idea. I call mine, 1st, 2nd, and ohmygawd   :D

Agree completely with main halyard at mast, although the Stackpack may change things. But I'm bowing to increasing age, and running my jib halyard aft, along with a down haul. Then I don't have to go to the bow to douse the jib. I know,, a roller furler would help that but my head sails are in too good a condition to scrap. Main is still no problem.
Charlie J
Sailing on S/V Tehani
Meridian 25

On Matagorda Bay
On the Redneck Riviera

Offline Godot

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Re: Bayfield 29
« Reply #71 on: September 15, 2015, 11:17:18 AM »
I've become fond of roller furling. I'm happy to keep adjusting my sails because it is just that easy. It hasn't failed me yet, although that does remind me that I really should find out what the maintenance needs (fresh water wash, inspection, lube?) are because I haven't done anything.

Existing sails are often modified to use with roller furling. Mine where. They work fine. But roller furling is expensive, and somewhat limiting in being able to change sails (I have a hank on storm jib; but don't see how I could fly it). If the boat came with hank on sails, I likely wouldn't have changed over (especially since with a cutter rig I have TWO headsails).
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

Offline Godot

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Re:Seeker, a Bayfield 29
« Reply #72 on: September 15, 2015, 04:56:21 PM »
In the post Cyric30's Search for a Boat, Jim_ME brought up some counterpoints to some things I mentioned. I have intending to respond for the better part of a year; but work has been killing me. I finally have time. Instead of polluting Cyric's thread, especially given the dated response, I thought I'd move this part of the convo here.

So when Adam [Godot] joined in this discussion, pointing out that the Tartan 30 performance specifications are very similar to those of his boat, I do want to say that my advice to you [Joe] is not intended as a critique of his choice of boat.

Whew! That's a relief!

I do seem to place more stock and weight on the performance specs, especially the Capsize Ratio and the Motion Comfort figures than he does. I do believe that when your boat design has these qualities, it is of benefit in more situations than at the kinds of conditions that one would encounter when rounding Cape Horn.

Just to be clear, I use the mental image of Cape Horn in place of boring statements like "Storm conditions" or some such yawner. Also, just to make a point, my opinions are based on my experiences, which in fact do not include storm conditions, Cape Horn, or anything close. They do include sailing in wind well into the thirties (near gale) with probably five to six feet, steep Chesapeake seas (I don't know...I'm guessing. The way I remember it they where moving mountains; but I don't have much of an eye for it), thirty knot winds with square seas (wind and current opposed in shallow water) in the Delaware, and an uncomfortable winter Gulf Stream crossing in a 40' Halberg-Rassy, and similar coastal experience. My opinion is also based on talking to a lot of often times contradictory sailors and reading a lot of often times contradictory books.

For example, I can remember taking my Typhoon out and enjoying sailing in the harbor in conditions that would make other boats (of that size or even larger) uncomfortable, and when I would pass some of them heading back in. There were times when I would take people out that were new to sailing and more sensitive to the motions of a sailboat, and I often believed that it was more comfortable for them. (I especially noticed this after selling the Typhoon 19 and taking people out in the my Rhodes Mariner 19.)

My boat LOVES heavier conditions, despite what a CSF or MCR might indicate. She's not squirrely in the least, and really comes alive when the wind is up. The wider beam keeps her on her feet, and her motion just isn't that extreme, except when sailing dead downwind with broadside seas when, without a stabilizing wind force in the sails, she develops an uncomfortable roll. It somewhat makes up for her rather lethargic conditions in lighter wind (we were sailing in company with Lauren's Mom and Step Dad on their Catalina 25 in light winds one day...to say I was embarrassed is a bit of an understatement). This isn't to say that the motion is always pleasant, just that it isn't overly unpleasant. The head (all the way in the bow of the boat) has even been successfully used underway in noticeable weather.

Adam has written that he would be okay taking his boat on a voyage across an ocean, and I admire that kind of spirit of adventure, but if I am being candid, I would have to confess that I would be interested to hear how he felt after being out in the kinds of conditions that boats with more favorable performance attributes have are reported to be better suited (or more optimized) for.

I very much want to cross an ocean someday, and believe I eventually will. I'm not sure what it is that draws me to the idea...discomfort, danger, isolation are all well known aspects of long distance short handed sailing. I think I am just drawn to difficult things.

I have a never been on a long passage in a better rated SailFar sized boat in snotty conditions, so I can't compare. But I don't think any SailFar sized boat is going to feel like a luxury liner at sea in heavy conditions. Some might be somewhat more comfortable; but no matter the boat, you are likely to get beat up.

So, with that all out of the way, my thoughts on the frequently discussed CSF and MCR.

The CSF, born out of the '79 Fastnet Race disaster, was an attempt to quantify the risk of capsize in a simplified formula. The formula only considers two criteria: Beam and Dispacement. CSF = Beam / (Displacement/64.2)1/3. The general rule is that 2.0 or below is considered relatively safe for offshore sailing with lower numbers being better. Several yacht races use the 2.0 as the cutoff level. There are several important things that the CSF fails to consider. Specifically hull shape and ballast location. The frequently stated absurd example of a boat with its' balast being placed entirely at the top of the mast, while having a CSF exactly the same as a boat with similar beam and balast but placed six feet under the keel would clearly have very different stabilities. So, with that obviously unlikely comparison we can sort of get a feel for the limitations of the formula. That's not to say it is without value. I think it has a lot of value. Merely that it is not the whole picture.

It is with some satisfaction that Seeker makes the csf 2.0 grade if I use the displacement (8500#) that the former Bayfield president Jake Rogerson suggests is accurate (resulting in a CSF of 1.99) than the advertised displacement (8000#) which is very slightly above 2.0 (2.03), or the designed displacement (7100# which brings the CSF all the way up to 2.12). According to a remarkably balance Canadian Yachting article, the boat is built heavier and stronger than designed, and it was designed as an offshore boat.

The Motion Comfort Ratio (MCR or just CR) was invented by Ted Brewer as a "tonque-in-cheek" (his words) measure of motion comfort, that is reasonably useful comparing two otherwise similar boats. The formula is "Displacement in pounds / (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x B1.333)." Plugging the numbers into some of the Sailfar favorites we get:
BoatMCR
Bayfield 2923.46
Pearson Ariel23.86
Seafarer Meridian29.66
Pearson Triton27.97
Alberg 3031.67

So, my Bayfield compares comperably with the well regarded Pearson Ariel and less so with the others, although it is not clear to me how big a difference I can expect with the differences in value.

To quote Ted Brewer again, though...

Quote from: Ted Brewer
Do consider, though, that a sailing yacht heeled by a good breeze will have a much steadier motion than one bobbing up and down in light airs on left over swells from yesterday's blow; also that the typical summertime coastal cruiser will rarely encounter the wind and seas that an ocean going yacht will meet. Nor will one human stomach keep down what another stomach will handle with relish, or with mustard and pickles for that matter! It is all relative.

Now, let's consider what it is that I was looking for in a sailboat.
  • Reasonably easy to single hand. (I've done a bunch of single handing...except for docking, which is tricky with or without crew, it has not been an issue)
  • Wouldn't break me in marina costs (usually determined by LOA, so under 30') (Perfectly placed to keep me on the moderate priced dock)
  • Solid, strong, and seaworthy (overbuilt, really. Very solid.)
  • Comfortable for a newly divorced bachelor to live aboard while still earning a living (never tested. By the time I was finally out of my house, I was comfortably living with a new gal)
  • Comfortable enough to take on a new first mate! (The new gal seems very comfortable with the space aboard on our one month cruise).
  • Shallow draft to better enjoy the Chesapeake, and eventually Bahamian waters (I have only run aground twice...once in Barnegat Bay through a frequently shifting channel, and another when I underestimated the tide range and the boat settled at night...not bad given where we've been.
  • Affordable to purchase, outfit, and maintain (very subjective...I spent a little more than I should have, probably, which is delaying the eventual departure; but I payed a lot less than I could have.
  • Attractive (a very personal thing that to my eye Seeker excels at beautifully)
Boats are compromises. Other boats may be better suited to live-aboard life, or heavy weather, or entertainment value, or cruisability, or stowage, or affordability, or speed, or shear sexiness. But, overall, I think Seeker's compromises suit me fairly well.

Again, I wouldn't want to ride out a storm on her. I wouldn't want ride out a storm on any boat. I can't imagine that ever being comfortable no matter the CSF or MCR. But I think she is perfectly capable of it. She heaves to well. She is quite strong. I've sailed her in winds around 35 knots in, if not comfort, at least solid control (I greatly desired a third reef at this point, as Seeker was certainly overpowered). This year I hove to in a thunderstorm, double reefed, with winds reportedly gusting to forty (minor damage was sustained when I didn't tie up the bunt, which subsequently filled with water in the deluge).

I think my heavy weather tactics will include heaving to whenever the sustained wind is staying north of thirty, unless I need to maneuver to avoid land or something. This depends on point of sail, of course, so I may stretch the envelope heading downwind if the seas aren't making things too unpleasant, and may shrink the envelope if sea conditions are particularly unpleasant. It's worth noting that in the '79 Fastnet race, of the 26 yachts that chose to heave to (my preferred heavy weather tactic), none of them experienced a knockdown or serious damage. At some point in the envelope I haven't explored yet I would probably stream my sea anchor (a several year old, mint condition Fiorentino 6' Para-Anchor that I bought off a long time world cruiser who had never felt the need to deploy it).

In the end, based on my experience so far, I believe Seeker to be more than safe enough for anything less than extreme adventure sailing or daysailing in a hurricane. She should be reasonably comfortable sailing in most normal conditions (say, up to thirty knots, assuming she isn't being broadsided by waves), and quite comfortable hove to in much stronger winds (I haven't hit the envelope yet where she isn't comfortable, relatively speaking, hove to).
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

Offline CharlieJ

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Re: Seeker, a Bayfield 29
« Reply #73 on: September 15, 2015, 07:25:09 PM »
Very well said.. Many years ago I had intended to be a world voyager. Life kinda changed my plans.

Totally content now to stay in Gulf of Mexico ( which CAN be VERY nasty) around the coast, and crossings to the Bahamas..

if I can make those, It's enough
Charlie J
Sailing on S/V Tehani
Meridian 25

On Matagorda Bay
On the Redneck Riviera

Offline Godot

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Re: Seeker, a Bayfield 29
« Reply #74 on: December 15, 2017, 01:31:36 PM »


Oh, yea, about the "couple years"...it's been a "couple years" for several years now. I think I need to lock down a date, and soon. I'm thinking November 1st, 2015 as my get out of dodge deadline. Earlier is better.


Apparently I'm fatally optimistic. November 1st? This year? Dreaming! How's about April 2018?

Fatal optimism appears to be my downfall. Work on the boat is much slower than hoped. Of course. Getting married threw an interesting (but not fatal) wrench into the works. And a careful look at my finances was somewhat enlightening.

Wifey is still OK, if not truly enthusiastic, about my taking an extended sailing trip sometime in the foreseeable  future (at this point...five to seven years out...further details below). It was an understanding we had when we first started dating. A long sailing trip is a dream, and I fully intend to pursue it. It's not quite clear, yet, if she will come with me for the whole trip or meet me at various locations for a few weeks sailing at a time. Plenty of time to figure that stuff out. She has similar dreams, too, but they involve extended travel in a land yacht (RV). I see no reason we can't do both.

Looking at finances, I've actually done fairly well over the past seven or eight years. Remarkable, really, as at one point I was so far underwater I thought if it wasn't for my little 24' Seafarer I could have ended up living out of my car.  I avoided that near homelessness scenario, and things have gone well enough since then (with a ridiculous amount of effort) that I have recently realized that I can see the point of financial independence (defined as having enough passive income to cover expenses) from here. I should be able to get there in five to seven years. Then I shouldn't have to worry about going back to work. I'll be 53-55 years old. A fairly early retirement. If I leave on the trip sooner, I will definitely need to go back to work, and likely for less pay and for more years than if I just push through. So, I'll stay the course for now. Honestly, it was easier to plan on a few years off when I was in my thirties, with a lot less fear of being destitute with still a lot of working life ahead of me. I missed that window, but this new future window looks much more solid.

In the meantime, I finally broke down and winterized the engine. It's snowing. Winter is here. Oh, well. I'm going to need to do some engine work anyhow. It is smoking a bit more than I like. I'm not sure what is going on; but black smoke means it is running too rich. I replaced the rusted out exhaust elbow, but that didn't help much (though it needed to be done). I suspect it is the injectors. But I haven't adjusted the valves since I have owned the boat, so that could be part of it. I am considering a whole top overhaul. We'll see. I probably want to do something before I finally hit my freedom date.

Besides regular maintenance, I think the only upgrade to the boat since the last lengthy list was that I made the Starboard berth a permanent double, with new five inch foam and a pretty decent new cover. I also installed a couple new drawers under the now permanent bunk extension. I can't complain.

It's been more than two years since I have hauled the boat. I probably should have done it this winter; but I'm not quite ready to do all the major work I have planned on my next long haul. Depending on how the bottom paint is holding up, I may haul for a week next summer or go for a long haul next winter. We'll see.

This winter I think I'm going to work on the port settee, making it slightly wider and give it new cushions. I think I'll eventually get a new backrest on it so that it is a bit more comfortable has a couch. I'm sure I'll come up with a few other little projects, too.
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay

Online Frank

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Re: Seeker, a Bayfield 29
« Reply #75 on: December 15, 2017, 04:39:07 PM »
Great update.
Well written...
Keep the faith....
God made small boats for younger boys and older men

Offline Norman

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Re: Seeker, a Bayfield 29
« Reply #76 on: December 15, 2017, 07:21:02 PM »
Looking from the other edge of the age line, I would suggest that you get the Bayfield into basic safe and reliable shape, and take a series of trips to various areas, and become acclimated to the togetherness in quantity.

Getting out there with a less than perfect boat, so long as it is safe, will help to smooth the transition.  I call that unplugging, rather than cutting the cord. 

I do envy you being young enough to be strong and flexible enough to make the lifestyle change.  I am still in quite good health for my age, but strength and agility are sliding.  I could have done it when I retired, at 62, but unfortunately, my wife gets seasick in 6 inch waves.  I did a lot of solo up until last year.  My boat did not get in the water this year, maybe better luck next year.

Keep your eye on the goal, and get out sailing!

Norman


Offline Godot

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Re: Seeker, a Bayfield 29
« Reply #77 on: December 15, 2017, 10:51:07 PM »
Actually, I sailed a fair amount this year. Two trips where over ten days, with probably a half dozen additional overnights. Plus more day-sailing than is typical for me. Last year the boat barely left the dock. This year she could barely sit still for a week. My last sail was just two weeks ago.

Heck, I was aboard today, in the snow, sipping on a tea and doing some work on the laptop. Yup. Seeker is getting a lot of use.

Outside of being fatter than I like, I'm quite reasonably healthy. But I'm afraid for my longevity. My father died at 59, and his father died at 59. I can't rule out that I will go the same way, though I like to think I'm taking somewhat better care of myself. Still...the earlier I can get out of the rat race, the better. And the sooner I can just go sailing for a long time, the more likely the body will cooperate and let me. I really wish I could have made it when I was in my thirties; but I made my choices and I'll probably be OK in the end. Heck, even if I'm out cruising in my fifties, I will probably be on the younger side of average.

Wifey and I did spend a month aboard a few years ago. The first couple weeks, and the first week in particular, almost did us in. But it got better as time went on. I just know I need to slow down when she is aboard. Sail shorter legs, when possible, and when arriving in a harbor plan on staying at least two or three days. My tendency is to push on to the next destination. Her's is to take it slower and enjoy where we are. She is probably right.

Offshore legs are not her thing. I like them a lot. We'll find a compromise, even if it means she has to meet me periodically.

Is it spring yet?
Adam
Bayfield 29 "Seeker"
Middle River, Chesapeake Bay