Author Topic: Stern Anchoring  (Read 667 times)

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Offline Owly055

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Stern Anchoring
« on: January 04, 2017, 04:43:52 PM »
     A number of folks in the yachting community have spoken of the advantages on their boats of stern anchoring..... including Anne Hill.   The problem of course is that other boats assume you are bow anchored as everybody else seems to do, and this can create issues.   Here is an article on the topic worth reading on the Jordan website.   In one instance related here, a boat (Hunter 376) and skipper rode out Hurricane Ike on two stern anchors under winds that reached 110 mph, and destroyed houses, and numerous boats.  The boat had 2 anchors out, one with 200' scope, and one with 300', both from the stern, anchored in 20-30' depth.  The open transom resulted in flooding issues, and the bilge pump failed at one point, and needless to say, the skipper was very shaken up by the experience.  But both anchors held, and the boat didn't pitch or yaw, but lay stern to through the whole event.    I don't believe I would have the nerve to sit out a hurricane at anchor in ANY boat.  Clearly a man with big cohones, but once committed, he had no choice.   
     The author describes boats in hurricane force winds on moorings from the bow, swinging wildly one way, and being knocked down, then swinging the other way and being knocked down due to the fundamental dynamic instability of bow anchoring on modern yachts.   
      The open transom, and the conventional washboard companionway, and probably many poorly sealed openings and ports were big liabilities.   One lesson I take from this is that one should rig a heavy cockpit cover level with the gunnels if possible in preparation for something like this so what waves reach the cockpit mostly pass over it rather than filling it.   Of course the open transom is the ultimate cockpit drain, but also a channel right to the companionway.   To me these are things well worth thinking about.
                                                                                  H.W.

                                                               

http://www.jordanseriesdrogue.com/d_14.htm


                               H.W.

Offline lastgreatgeneration

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2017, 06:01:50 PM »
I have done some further research on this topic but I can't seem to find more information. The only problem I see on some boats including my own is that the stern cleats are positioned in such a way that there will be chafe on the stern cap rail. Otherwise it seems to make sense. Also, I get how you can use two anchors from one cleat but what about one anchor from both cleats? How would that be rigged up? You would obviously have to rig it so it's equal not being too far to port or starboard.

Thanks for the information, I will have to experiment with this.
I now have a cannon, pirates ye be warned! Also a pirate sword!

Offline CharlieJ

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2017, 07:26:41 PM »
I've said before-I never anchor by the stern, except during the day. Then I'll take the anchor rode aft on the outside, and drop it on a stern cleat. When night comes, I simply drop it off the cleat and the boat swings around, bow too. In a situation where I worry about it sheering about, I set two anchors in a large VEE. Boat pretty much just sits.

Hard to argue with Annie Hill though :)
Charlie J
Sailing on S/V Tehani
Meridian 25

On Matagorda Bay
On the Redneck Riviera

Offline lastgreatgeneration

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2017, 07:37:31 PM »
I've said before-I never anchor by the stern, except during the day. Then I'll take the anchor rode aft on the outside, and drop it on a stern cleat. When night comes, I simply drop it off the cleat and the boat swings around, bow too. In a situation where I worry about it sheering about, I set two anchors in a large VEE. Boat pretty much just sits.

Hard to argue with Annie Hill though :)

Charlie,
When using 2 anchors on your 25', how much rode do you pay out and at what depth? I have set 2 anchors twice, not in a v but across from one another about almost 100 yards apart. Normally in this situation the wind comes out of the south or the north and I don't have much swing room. I figure if one anchor is fouled and drags the other one will eventually catch up and set. Not in trying conditions typically, sometimes I do that when I leave the boat for a few days. Gives me great peace of mind.
I now have a cannon, pirates ye be warned! Also a pirate sword!

Offline CharlieJ

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2017, 07:58:32 PM »
Kinda depends on water depth. I carry 75 feet of chain on the main anchor and almost NEVER anchor with less than 45 feet out. Remember to add bow height off water to depth for scope. Then I'll either sheer the boat off to one side, ,and drop the second, , which carries 25 feet of chain. Usually at roughly a 45 degree angle. With the chain rodes, I usually go for at least 6 -1 on the rodes

I also try hard to not anchor in less than about 8 feet, unless in an extremely well protected spot. Got caught in a severe thunderstorm once, ,anchored in 6 1/2 feet and slammed the bottom hard enough to crack it. Had to haul the boat and repair

Of course, in an anchorage with other boats, ,how THEY are anchored is pretty much how you have to do it. If they are lying to a Bahama moor, you'd best do the same, and vice versa. Causes frayed tempers otherwise :)

This pic shows my main anchor
Charlie J
Sailing on S/V Tehani
Meridian 25

On Matagorda Bay
On the Redneck Riviera

Offline CharlieJ

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2017, 08:00:04 PM »
and here's the foredeck. Those are 12 inch cleats
Charlie J
Sailing on S/V Tehani
Meridian 25

On Matagorda Bay
On the Redneck Riviera

Offline lastgreatgeneration

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2017, 03:18:14 PM »
and here's the foredeck. Those are 12 inch cleats

Great to know. Thanks for the tip about shallow water, I have never considered that. I'm in the Chesapeake mud, the tide was so low at one point I scrubbed my waterline and cleaned the prop! That's a great setup you have there. I'm in the process of planning to build my next elusive boat almost from a bare hull. I have been taking extensive notes.
I now have a cannon, pirates ye be warned! Also a pirate sword!

ralay

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2017, 08:31:44 PM »
Are we talking about this as a storm tactic or as an everyday way to anchor?

Offline cap-couillon

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2017, 01:55:08 AM »
I anchor Solitaire off the stern on a regular basis... Not in a seaway or an area with heavy fetch, but in an otherwise calm but breezy anchorage it works a charm. With a normal bow hook she dances on the anchor like a drunken gypsy... with a stern hook she lays to quiet as a lamb.

Another advantage is I can set and  retrieve the anchor from the cockpit. Of course people look at you funny.  Now that I am on a mooring I have the same problem as the anchor dance. A riding sail helps but still a lot of back and forth. Chafes the mooring whips and just a general PITA. Bet if I turned her around and ran a pair of whips off the stern cleats it would solve the problem.

Wonder how long till the management would tell me "you can not do that" ?

 :)
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ralay

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2017, 12:49:43 PM »
@Cap couilion: How do you retrieve your anchor if your anchorage becomes suddenly uncalm?  Can you pull the boat backwards into wind/waves by hand/with a winch?  Or do you have to use the motor and worry about not letting any of it foul the prop?

Offline cap-couillon

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Re: Stern Anchoring
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2017, 12:13:35 PM »
Never had it be an issue.... But in the event of an emergency, would probably just tie a fender to the  bitter end of the rode and heave the whole mess over the side. Stern ground tackle is "spare" and carried in the cockpit locker anyway.  Retrieve after situation has resolved itself?
Cap' Couillon

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