Cruisin' Threads > Boat Bits

Windvanes & self steering systems.

<< < (8/11) > >>

Oldrig:
Thanks for posting this site. It looks interesting--I've also been interested in exploring windvane steering. Cost has always been a factor.

I'll have to e-mail Sven and see if his new product is suitable for a full-keeled, heavy-displacement boat with a rudder that's part of the keel. (In other words, would "Mr. Vane," which is specifically designed for small boats, be suitable for my Cape Dory 25D?)

Anyway, it's a nice link to explore.

--Joe

barnaclephill:
I see you guys asked about 15 months ago about the Norvane windvane. I have put one on my 26' yacht and am very satisfied with it. when there's no wind it's not good, but I am happy with it because it is very reliable, it's sturdy and rugged as well as a brilliant piece of engineering. it follows the windshifts really well. It steers well straight downwind on a flat lake, but in 2mt swells where the boat wants to surf and broach any windvane is not brilliant at that angle of straight downwind. A little off the wind would be better, but it says the same thing in the autopilot instructions.

s/v Faith:

--- Quote from: barnaclephill on March 09, 2007, 01:01:47 AM ---I see you guys asked about 15 months ago about the Norvane windvane. I have put one on my 26' yacht and am very satisfied with it. ......
--- End quote ---

barnaclephill,

  Thanks for posting this, I would really like to see some pictures of the installation if you have any.

barnaclephill:
Hi S/v Faith,
in the attached photos you can see how the Norvane is set up on my yacht. The yacht is steel, and to save freight costs (California to Australia) I had the bent tubular arms and attachment parts made locally to a diagram Norca/the manufaturer gave me.
The vane can be rotated 180degrees when at anchorage/approaching a marina to save bumping into a dinghy or docks, and to save a little noise between the gears, etc as I did at Refuge. Underway there is no noise, but when anchored just the wave motion affects the paddle by about 5 degrees or one tooth meshing with another.  The solar panel is held flat underway to not disturb the windflow, but on a beam or tail wind it doesn't matter.  I have the yellow rope sewn to make a loop as it is easier than leaning over the back of the yacht in my installation.
On leaving the vane area, the red non-stretch rope leads to one block on each quarter and then to a chain and the chain goes over the tiller. I epoxied a 1/4" bolt  vertically through the tiller and about 18" of small chain is positioned across that. The red rope is tensioned (with a fiddle v-block) and terminated to the start of the small chain. This way I can adjust the vane's direction link-by-link for fine tuning, (esp. when motoring with no wind), but also to have a quick release mechanism without changing the aerofoil's alignment.

Overall I'm satisfied with it.
The reasons I bought it were that I was advised in a boat shop that the much cheaper autopilots wouldn't work satisfactorily with a steel boat, and even with a remote compass, the autopilot/compass would be about 20%cheaper than the windvane and installation. That 20% cost saving would be spent in solar& battery infrastructure, so all-in-all they come out at roughly equal in price. If I had a plastic boat , an autopilot is superficially less cost.
This Norvane was about the cheapest I discovered in my research, but as well as that was that it was solidly built from stainless and not aluminium, and at about 20kg was solid and couldn't bend like some ones that look (to me) flimsier. It also had a 5 year guarantee I think, and I bought a kit of spare bearings etc while I had the big freight cost. I liked Norca Industry's website also, in that there were clear pictures in which I could adequately see the quality and ruggedness of the design.

With the windvane steering, going straight downwind is ok on the Lakes, but out at sea in a 2 metre swell my boat wants to surf and then try to broach/round down. I'm trying to figure this one out, but it seems that does occur only when within about 10 degrees each side of straight downwind, and it may very probably also have to do with me having the mainsail up as well, and something to do with the speed - I read that I could hand the main and slow down and waves will overtake me rather than catching up to me and causing me to surf.
I read in the Tillerpilot instruction book (newly acquired) that it advises also to avoid that same angle of near straight downwind sailing. I recently bought a tillerpilot because I've had enough of hand steering on 50 mile passages with no wind.

I hope that answers your question.

AdriftAtSea:

--- Quote ---With the windvane steering, going straight downwind is ok on the Lakes, but out at sea in a 2 metre swell my boat wants to surf and then try to broach/round down. I'm trying to figure this one out, but it seems that does occur only when within about 10 degrees each side of straight downwind, and it may very probably also have to do with me having the mainsail up as well, and something to do with the speed - I read that I could hand the main and slow down and waves will overtake me rather than catching up to me and causing me to surf.
I read in the Tillerpilot instruction book (newly acquired) that it advises also to avoid that same angle of near straight downwind sailing. I recently bought a tillerpilot because I've had enough of hand steering on 50 mile passages with no wind.
--- End quote ---

I think this is pretty universal to most windvanes and autopilots in general.  It depends a lot on the boat, as some are less likely to try and broach.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version