Author Topic: Salsa arives in Salvador Brazil after crossing the Atlantic.  (Read 2459 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Kirkalittle

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 10
  • kARRR-ma: +0/-0
    • www.SailngSalsa.com
Just realized that my status hadn't been updated on here for quite a while.  After another typical trade-wind passage (wet and rolly) Salsa arrived in reasonable condition and with little drama in Brazil about a month ago. 

There are a few updates on my website, including the passage from South Africa to Saint Helena, a Saint Helena review, and the most recent passage from Saint Helena to Brazil I'll copy here, the rest are on www.SailingSalsa.com.   Ooops as usual it's too big to post here so I'll just put a teaser-paragraph and you can read the rest on the website. 

I departed Saint Helena on July 5th at 1PM with 1919 Nautical Miles between me and Salvador, Brazil.  In less than 48 hours from the start I had been "pooped" where a breaking wave filled the cockpit with water, and as close to being knocked down on my side as I have ever been,  I think the official definition of "knocked down" is when the boat is over 90 degrees from vertical, so literally on her side.  I'm not sure how far over we went that second night but it must have been around 70 degrees' from vertical, I was in a deep sleep and would have been knocked out of bed if it weren't for the lee-cloth (netting) that holds me in place, things that have never moved before went flying across the cabin, and a nice little wall of water came inside after it completely filled the cockpit.  Moments later the emergency bilge pump came on, not exactly unexpected as quite a bit of water made it inside, but not enough to be concerned about.  I mostly remember feeling startled and angry.  Even though I couldn't think of any good reason to be scared, considering that within just a few seconds the boat was back to vertical, and about one minute later all the water was pumped and drained out.  By some act of god, my computer didn't even get wet (but don't worry it will later).  Looking back at my actual log entry I wrote "4AM, My God, knocked down and pooped, was going 5.4kts with triple reefed main sail only.  Now down to bare poles and still making 4.2kts".   The next log entry was at 9AM "Sailing with bare poles (so no sails up at all), winds ESE 30+kts, boat speed 4.8kts, 210 miles down, 1715 miles to go, and a squall sneaking up on me..."  At that point I was contemplating how I was going to slow the boat down for when the squall arrived.   Either string some very long warps (ropes) off of the stern for drag, heave to, or maybe use this opportunity to try out my sea anchor.  In the end the squall was brief enough and I simply continued to ride it out with no sail up.  I think that was as rough as it got on the entire passage...... The rest is on the blog-site.
Kirk Little, Alberg 30 # 504 "Salsa"

Offline Tim

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2172
  • kARRR-ma: +182/-1
  • Under the Golden Gate
    • My Galleries
Re: Salsa arives in Salvador Brazil after crossing the Atlantic.
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 12:18:14 PM »
Thanks for checking in Kirk, good to hear you are near closing the loop, great adventures!
"Mariah" Pearson Ariel #331, "Chiquita" CD Typhoon, M/V "Wild Blue" C-Dory 25

"The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
W.A. Ward

Offline Cruiser2B

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 193
  • kARRR-ma: +6/-0
Re: Salsa arives in Salvador Brazil after crossing the Atlantic.
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 04:33:05 PM »
Another successful leg of your journey, congrads!. When the boat got pooped, how far did she settle in the rear and how long did it take for cockpit to drain....?

I saw this Pearson Triton that was modified for blue water and the guy told me to make a cover board like ths for cockpit to reduce amount of water in case of getting pooped. Was wondering what your thought might be now that it has happened to you...probably more tha once.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2012, 04:34:43 PM by Cruiser2B »
1976 Westsail 32 #514 Morning Sun
1971 Alberg 30 #457 (for Sale)
www.svsalacia.blogspot.com
Preparing to get underway!!
USCG 100T Master Near Coastal with Inland Aux Sail
Captain Atlantic Explorer

Offline Kirkalittle

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 10
  • kARRR-ma: +0/-0
    • www.SailngSalsa.com
Re: Salsa arives in Salvador Brazil after crossing the Atlantic.
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2012, 06:01:10 AM »
Yes she has been pooped several times, only a hand full of times was filled completely.  First off, It never seemed that serious, I didn't make a conscience effort to examine the boat trim regarding your settling in the rear, so it wasn't obviously noticeable but then again I had other things going through my head.  But I will make a few points which are largely just my opinions on the subject;

a) Regarding a lot of discussion about the cockpit drains and opinions regarding how they must drain within 1 minute or 2 minutes etc.  Mine two cockpit drains are original, with a type of screen over them and drain fairly slowly.  BUT, in the kind of conditions where you get pooped in an Alberg 30, about half of the water is out within 10 seconds just from the rolling motion of the boat.  About a minute later you are down to maybe 1/3 full, and then another minute or two to get dry, and the trip doesn't SEEM to be affected enough to make you feel extra vulnerable to more boarding waves. 

b) The biggest problem is water getting inside the boat via the companionway, the cockpit lockers (and in my case very little via the rudder post, ignition panel, and fuel access port.  Normally in rough conditions I have at least one (of 3) boards locked (with a bungee) into place to keep most water out of the cabin, but in this last case I only had a plastic 'curtain' up and still less than a gallon of water came inside so my only worries were wetness and the electronics. 

c) Sealing up the cockpit lockers is a big deal, as a lot of water can find it's way through and while mostly harmless and quickly arriving in the bilge I very happy the James Baldwin had me glue in automotive trim type foam to seal these lockers during my refit.  I suppose the false floor would be a big help to keep water out but I wouldn't be willing to sacrifice that space as I walk there and keep my feet there when I'm in the cockpit. 

d) Lastly I very much wish I had sealed or relocated the engine control panel as it has suffered a lot of premature damage as a result of being submerged multiple times being located inside the lower part of the cockpit. 

Hope that is the info you were looking for! -Kirk
Kirk Little, Alberg 30 # 504 "Salsa"

Offline Sunset

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 214
  • kARRR-ma: +13/-0
Re: Salsa arives in Salvador Brazil after crossing the Atlantic.
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2012, 09:42:56 AM »
I found the whole tread interesting. Thanks

 But I had not even thought about this!

d) Lastly I very much wish I had sealed or relocated the engine control panel as it has suffered a lot of premature damage as a result of being submerged multiple times being located inside the lower part of the cockpit. 

I will keeping this in mind as the design of my cockpit comes together.

Thanks again for sharing.

Offline Cruiser2B

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 193
  • kARRR-ma: +6/-0
Re: Salsa arives in Salvador Brazil after crossing the Atlantic.
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2012, 12:23:39 PM »
1976 Westsail 32 #514 Morning Sun
1971 Alberg 30 #457 (for Sale)
www.svsalacia.blogspot.com
Preparing to get underway!!
USCG 100T Master Near Coastal with Inland Aux Sail
Captain Atlantic Explorer